As her fame increased, her faith refused to return. Her smile, she said, was a mask. "What do I labor for?" she asked in one letter. "If there be no God, there can be no soul. If there be no soul then, Jesus, You also are not true."

Letters Reveal Mother Teresa's Secret

 
In life, Mother Teresa was an icon — for believers — of God's work on Earth. Her ministry to the poor of Calcutta was a world-renowned symbol of religious compassion. She was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. In a rare interview in 1986, Mother Teresa told CBS News she had a calling, based on unquestioned faith.

"They are all children of God, loved and created by the same heart of God," she said. But now, it has emerged that Mother Teresa was so doubtful of her own  faith that she feared being a hypocrite, reports CBS News correspondent Mark Phillips. In a new book that compiles letters she wrote to friends, superiors and confessors, her doubts are obvious. Shortly after beginning work in Calcutta's slums, the spirit left Mother Teresa.

"Where is my faith?" she wrote. "Even deep down… there is nothing but emptiness and darkness... If there be God — please forgive me." Eight years later, she was still looking to reclaim her lost faith. "Such deep longing for God… Repulsed, empty, no faith, no love, no zeal," she said.

As her fame increased, her faith refused to return. Her smile, she said, was a mask. "What do I labor for?" she asked in one letter. "If there be no God, there can be no soul. If there be no soul then, Jesus, You also are not true."

"These are letters that were kept in the archbishop's house," the Rev. Brian Kolodiejchuk told Phillips. The letters were gathered by Rev. Kolodiejchuk, the priest who's making the case to the Vatican for Mother Teresa's proposed sainthood. He said her obvious spiritual torment actually helps her case. "Now we have this new understanding, this new window into her interior life, and for me this seems to be the most heroic," said Rev. Kolodiejchuk.

According to her letters, Mother Teresa died with her doubts. She had even stopped praying, she once said. The church decided to keep her letters, even though one of her dying wishes was that they be destroyed. Perhaps now we know why.

The Vatican beatified Teresa and then followed it up with her canonization to revitalize the Church and inspire the faithful, especially at a time when churches are empty and the Roman authority is in decline.

Before Mother Teresa transitioned from this life she began to realize that she was being used by the Roman Catholic Church. The majority of the billions the Vatican received in donations, primarily because of her efforts, very little of that money reached its intended target (see Mother Teresa: Come Be My Light).

The "Blessed Teresa of Calcutta" lived a magnanimous life and had very good intentions, but she was actually being used by the colossal money hoarders, also known as the Vatican.

The Vatican owns thousands upon thousands of churches, cathedrals, monasteries, nunneries and sundry edifices throughout the world. The Catholic Church, once all her assets have been put together, is the most formidable stockholder in the world. The Wall Street Journal stated, "the Vatican's financial deals in the U.S. alone were so huge that very often it sold or bought gold in lots of a million or more dollars at one time."

The Roman Catholic Church and the Vatican have always been the most astounding wealth accumulator and property owner in existence. She has large investments in banking, insurance, chemicals, steel, construction, real estate, and the underworld (mob ties). Unlike ordinary stockholders, the Vatican pays no taxes on their income, which makes this organization, the biggest tax evader in the world. Unfortunately and unbeknownst to Mother Teresa (except toward the end of her life), she was simply the mouthpiece, or the promoter, for the devious and colossally deceptive, Roman Catholic Church.